Why Nonprofits Should Stop Avoiding Overqualified Candidates

Vacations are designed to be a tranquil escape from everyday stresses encountered at the workplace.  However, many Americans are finding reasons to either avoid or shorten their vacation time usage.

While it is true that American organizations are one of the top most productive business sectors in the world, lack of vacation will inevitably lead to poor physical and mental health, as well as increased turnover rates.  Vacations are imperative to maintaining vitality and work ethic throughout the office—increasing both productivity and happiness with one’s job and others.

With 61% of employed Americans expecting to work during their summer vacation, it’s no wonder many employees lack enthusiasm when planning their vacation time.  Here are some prevalent work-related activities vacationing workers often find inevitable:
 

  • 38% of workers anticipate receiving work-related emails.
  • 30% expect to answer work-related phone calls.
  • 24% presume they will receive work-related texts.
  • 20% believe they will be asked to do work by a boss, client, or colleague.
  • 32% assume they will be making preparations for incoming documents on their computer.

Developing stress prior to, during, and after vacation, due to interrupted work flow and lack of routine, many workers fail to recognize the positive effects vacation has on one’s work.

Use these methods to make vacations relaxing and work-free:
 

  • Vacation from technology, as well as the office.  Because our society is so reliant on our smartphones, and laptops, and tablets, checking a work voicemail or email unfortunately becomes second nature.  Either set a small amount of time aside for answering calls and messages, or shut off your devices altogether.
  • Think of vacation as a duty, rather than an optional perk.  Vacations are important to your health and attitude.  Even if you don’t think you need it, consistent days off helps you rejuvenate yourself—energy needed when going back to work.
  • Take short, but regular days off.  People are often more productive and cheerful in the days leading up to vacation.  If a week or more of vacation time is still too daunting, don’t be afraid to take long weekends off or spread out your vacation days.  More mini vacations give you more things to look forward to.
  • Have confidence in your staff and coworkers when you’re away.  Appoint a second-in-command for the duration of your absence.  Be sure to plan ahead and delegate responsibilities so you don’t feel pressure to check in while you’re on vacation.
  • Encourage your staff to take vacations.  Employees are often too timid to ask for days off in general, fearful of portraying a lazy work ethic.  As a superior, it’s up to you to publicize that vacation days are a vital necessity, not a sign of weakness.

Vacations are crucial to a worker’s sanity and general attitude towards the workplace.  Though it’s tough to step away from the computer and turn off the smartphone, time away from the office will provide you much needed rest, and the break you deserve.   Vacations are what help employees remain satisfied with their jobs, in turn keeping organizations competitive and successful.

Learn more about vacation and work time here.

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11/16/17 1:39 AM

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