Entries with Topic: HR Knowledge

One area where costs can quickly add up is recruitment. Finding the right talent for your organization is vital, but it can also be a significant expense. Fortunately, there are ways to reduce recruitment costs without sacrificing the quality of your hires.

Refine Your Hiring Strategy

Developing a more strategic approach to recruitment can help you save money. Start by examining your current process and identifying areas where you can streamline. Consider using new technology to automate tasks such as resume screening and scheduling interviews. This can free up your HR team’s time and reduce the need for additional staff.

Utilize Social Media

Social media platforms such as LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook can be an effective way to reach potential candidates. By using targeted ads, you can reach a larger audience of job seekers without breaking the bank.

Leverage Your Network

Networking can be a powerful tool when it comes to recruitment. Reach out to current employees, board members, and volunteers for referrals. This can help you find qualified candidates who are already familiar with your organization and its mission.

Internship Programs

Internship programs can be a great way to evaluate potential employees before making a full-time offer. Interns can be sourced from local colleges and universities, and while they may require some training and supervision, they can help you find a great fit for your team. Additionally, internships can provide valuable experience and networking opportunities to students who may become future employees.

Attend Job Fairs

Attending job fairs can be a great way to connect with candidates who are actively seeking employment. Many job fairs are free to attend, and they provide a platform to showcase your organization and open positions.

By implementing these strategies, you can reduce your recruitment costs and still find the right candidate for your organization.

Another way that nonprofits can save money is by using UST HR Workplace. This platform offers live certified HR experts, over 350 employee training courses, an online employee handbook builder, job description tools and various other resources.

And the best part? Nonprofits can try UST HR Workplace for free with a 60-day trial. So why not see for yourself how UST can help you save money and streamline your HR processes? Sign up today and start reducing your recruitment costs!

Explore additional blogs here for money-saving tips and tricks.

Question: Can I limit the number of times an employee makes changes to their W-4?

Answer: No. IRS guidance states that an employee has the right to make changes to their Form W-4 as often as they would like, and you, as the employer, need to make those changes, even if they’re frequent. The only exceptions are if the Form W-4 is invalid or if you have been previously notified by the IRS that the employee is subject to an IRS “lock-in letter.”

If an employee gives you a revised Form W-4, the IRS states that you need to begin the new withholding no later than the start of the first pay period ending on or after the 30th day of receiving the new form. We recommend having a standard process for implementing any new Forms W-4 and ensuring your employees are aware of that process.

This Q&A does not constitute legal advice and does not address state or local law.

This Q&A was provided by Mineral, powering the UST HR Workplace. Have HR questions? Sign your nonprofit up for a FREE 60-day trial here. As a UST member, simply log into your Mineral portal to access live HR certified consultants, 300+ on-demand training courses, an extensive compliance library, and more.

Creating an employee handbook provides a cornerstone reference guide for an organization. It serves as a central source of information about policies, procedures, and the organization’s culture.

For nonprofits, especially, where resources can be limited and roles diverse, the importance of an employee handbook is immense. A well-crafted HR employee handbook is a tool that shows commitment to consistency, fairness, and transparency in a nonprofit organization.

Further, a comprehensive handbook can also serve as a critical tool in risk management when it clearly outlines policies related to discrimination, harassment, and disciplinary actions.

If your nonprofit needs some tips regarding how to create an employee manual, we can help.

Planning Your Nonprofit Employee Handbook

Working for a nonprofit, you understand the critical importance of creating a plan for any project. An employee handbook is a valuable piece of organizational content, making the planning stage instrumental in its composition and eventual success.

Here is some preliminary work you can do.

1. Identify Goals for the Handbook

Determine why your nonprofit needs a handbook and what you want it to achieve. Dig deeper than outlining policies and procedures. Consider how it can support your nonprofit’s mission, reflect your organizational culture, and serve as a resource for employee engagement, safety, and overall satisfaction.

2. Gather Input and Insights from Key Individuals

Consult with various stakeholders involved with your nonprofit, including:

  • Leadership
  • Department Managers
  • HR Staff
  • Selected Employees

Once you have gathered everyone’s insights, it can help identify the most relevant content areas and address specific concerns or needs.

3. Review and Understand Legal Requirements

Do your research or reach out to a legal professional to understand the legal framework associated with employment in your area, including federal, state, and local laws. This step is essential to ensure your handbook complies with all legal requirements and best practices for employment.

4. Decide on the Right Structure and Format

Understanding the handbook’s format will help you keep things organized. One important consideration is the delivery and consumption method, so decide whether you want to distribute it digitally, as a hard copy, or both.

7 Steps to Create an Effective Employee Manual

By understanding the importance of employee handbooks and with some preparation out of the way, you can officially start creating an employee handbook ready for use with these seven steps.

1. Outline Your Nonprofit’s Mission and Values: Begin with a clear statement of your organization’s mission and values to your respective community, as well as to your stakeholders and employees. This first, crucial step sets the tone for the handbook and aligns employees with your nonprofit’s goals.

2. Define Employment Policies: Clearly lay out policies regarding employment terms, work hours, telecommuting, leaves of absence, PTO, and other employment-related matters. Ensure these policies comply with local, state, and federal laws.

3. Detail Compensation and Benefits: Include information about salaries, benefits, such as health insurance, retirement plans, vacation policies, training and professional development opportunities, and eligibility criteria. Customize these sections to reflect the unique offerings available to all employees and managers when working for your nonprofit.

4. Establish Conduct Guidelines: Outline expected behaviors and standards of conduct to create and foster a positive work atmosphere. This section should cover everything from the dress code to ethics and confidentiality policies.

5. Explain Performance Evaluation Processes: Describe how and when performance evaluations will be conducted. It is also important to let employees know who will conduct the reviews, what they will cover, and what the remediation process looks like if required. This step helps employees understand the expectations and metrics against which they will be monitored, compared, and assessed.

6. Provide Procedures for Reporting Grievances and Complaints: It’s important for employees to know how to report issues or concerns. Clearly outline the steps they should take if they need to file a grievance or report misconduct.

7. Regularly Update the Handbook: Laws and organizational policies evolve, so it’s crucial to review and update your handbook regularly.

Employee Handbook Examples

Providing real, working examples of employee handbooks in the nonprofit space can be incredibly helpful. If you have a network of fellow leaders in the nonprofit sector, you may ask a peer if you can discuss their strategy or review their handbook.

Alternatively, since specific examples tailored to nonprofits may be harder to come by, looking at handbooks from a variety of sectors can offer inspiration and best practices.

Are You Ready to Create Your HR Employee Handbook?

We hope these tips will get you started, but you don’t have to plan, outline, and compose this important organizational asset on your own. Creating an employee handbook is a significant undertaking, so we encourage you to reach out to us for support.

At UST, we offer an extensive menu of nonprofit HR solutions for community-focused organizations that don’t have full-time, designated HR teams. Start with our reliable UST HR Workplace for guidance. Our professionals can help you prepare to craft your handbook, offering updated legal and regulatory information and overall best practices.

Explore the value of our services for yourself by signing up for our FREE 60-day trial, or contact us to discuss your nonprofit’s unique HR needs and Choose UST.

SOURCES

www.abelajlaw.com/non-profits/non-profit-employee-handbook/

No specific citation/allusion, but helpful: blog.airmason.com/employee-handbook-for-non-profit/

www.chooseust.org/solutions-overview

www.chooseust.org/hr-trial

www.chooseust.org/contact-us

Question: We recently made a couple of small updates to our employee handbook. Do we need to have employees sign a new handbook for each update?

Answer: No. For small, minor updates, you don’t need employees to sign off, especially if you simply made an administrative change like updating the name of your employee assistance program provider, correcting a typo, or adding a clarifying statement. A simple communication to all employees to let them know that the change has been made, why, and where to find the change should suffice as notice.

Larger changes, like a brand-new policy or an update with essential changes, would warrant a new employee signature, especially if they could be disciplined for violating the new or updated policy. If you need to discipline an employee related to the new policy or update, their signature will help show that they were made aware of the change.

This Q&A does not constitute legal advice and does not address state or local law.

This Q&A was provided by Mineral, powering the UST HR Workplace. Have HR questions? Sign your nonprofit up for a FREE 60-day trial here. As a UST member, simply log into your Mineral portal to access live HR certified consultants, 300+ on-demand training courses, an extensive compliance library, and more.

When it comes to running a nonprofit organization, one of the most important aspects is creating a productive and safe workplace for your employees. Building a Human Resources department is an essential part of ensuring that your organization’s employees are equipped with the necessary resources, support, and guidance to succeed in their roles. In this blog, we’ll discuss the 5 top benefits of creating a Human Resources department and share how UST Workforce Solutions can help you achieve your HR goals.

1. Recruitment and Retention

One of the primary functions of the Human Resources department is to attract and retain top talent. A well-organized HR department can assist with the recruitment process by creating job descriptions, screening applications, and conducting interviews. UST HR Workplace can help your nonprofit organization streamline this process by providing job description tools, downloadable forms, and checklists, and provide access to HR experts.

2. Compliance and Risk Management

Compliance and risk management are critical aspects for any nonprofit organization, and a Human Resources department can help ensure that your organization is meeting all legal requirements and avoiding risks. UST HR Workplace offers a cloud-based HR platform that provides templates, trainings, and expert guidance to help nonprofits stay compliant with state and federal regulations.

3. Employee Training and Development

Nonprofit organizations rely heavily on the skills and expertise of their employees to achieve their mission. HR departments play a crucial role in identifying training needs and ensuring that employees have access to ongoing development opportunities. As part of our HR Workplace platform, you have access to over 300+ on-demand employee training courses, including topics on diversity and inclusion, harassment prevention, and leadership development.

4. Workforce Management

A Human Resources department helps manage the workforce by tracking employee attendance, performance, and compensation. With UST, nonprofits can access an online employee handbook builder and gain expertise on managing employee relations.

5. Strategic Planning

A well-organized HR department can help inform strategic planning by providing insights into trends, employee needs, and organizational strengths and weaknesses. With access to UST HR Workplace, nonprofits can leverage expert guidance to develop long-term plans that align with their mission and meet their workforce needs.

Overall, building a dedicated HR department can provide significant benefits for nonprofits. From ensuring compliance to attracting and retaining top talent to creating a positive workplace culture, human resources is a crucial element of nonprofit success. UST HR Workplace offers a FREE 60-day HR trial to help nonprofits see the benefits for themselves, so why not give it a try? Contact us today to learn more!

Question: Are there any questions we should avoid when interviewing job candidates?

Answer:  Yes. You should avoid questions that cause an applicant to tell you about their inclusion in a protected class. Don’t ask about race, national origin, citizenship status, religious affiliation, disabilities, pregnancy, sexual orientation or gender identity, past illnesses (including use of sick leave or workers’ comp claims), age, genetic information, or military service. You should also avoid asking about things that might be protected by state law (e.g., marital status and political affiliation). If you were to ask any questions pertaining to these matters, rejected candidates could claim that your decision was based on their inclusion in these classes rather than their credentials.

The types of questions you ask a job candidate should be job-related and nondiscriminatory. This may seem obvious, but employers sometimes ask problematic questions because they believe they are job-related. For instance, an interviewer might ask an applicant if they have any back issues when they are trying to determine if the applicant can lift 25 pounds repeatedly throughout the day. Or when seeking someone to fill a position on Sundays, they might ask if the applicant is Christian or goes to church. Both of these questions are plainly discriminatory and could get an employer into significant trouble.

Thankfully, there’s a way to get this information without asking discriminatory questions. Instead of considering the things that could get in the way of an applicant doing the job and asking about those, frame the question so that it’s about the essential duties of the position. Can they lift 25 pounds all day every day? Are they available on Sunday since that’s the day you are hiring for? Simple adjustments and precautions can go a long way toward a compliant interview process. 

On a final note, you should also avoid questions that are asked purely out of curiosity (Do you have children? What kind of accent is that? What do you do for fun?), as those can easily be misconstrued as discriminatory. When in doubt, return to the job description. Make sure your questions are directly related to the essential duties and answer the ultimate question—can the applicant do the job?

This Q&A was provided by Mineral, powering the UST HR Workplace. Have HR questions? Sign your nonprofit up for a FREE 60-day trial here. As a UST member, simply log into your Mineral portal to access live HR certified consultants, 300+ on-demand training courses, an extensive compliance library, and more.

Nonprofit organizations improve communities by providing impactful services, including everything from educating, sheltering, healing, nurturing and so much more. Nearly everyone in the United States has benefited from a nonprofit organization in one way or another. The roughly 1.3 million nonprofit organizations in the U.S. need assistance to operate and help as many people as possible.

Internship programs offer numerous benefits to nonprofit organizations. Interns provide much-needed assistance, unique skill sets and fresh ideas. Internships can also lead to new hires that help the organization operate and grow for years to come. Even interns who do not become full-time employees often remain proponents of the organization.

There’s no denying that nonprofit internships are valuable, but finding the right interns can be a challenge. Discover how you can recruit and hire interns who will have a positive impact on your organization through their hard work and unique skills:

Where to Locate Your Nonprofit Interns

Nonprofit internships offer many benefits to the organization, as well as to the interns themselves. However, locating the right recruits may feel like finding a needle in a haystack at times. The following are several places to find quality recruits, so you can spend less time searching and more time offering your much-needed services.

College Career Offices

College students make excellent interns, as they’re often eager to learn about the industry they study. University career centers often have partnerships with businesses and nonprofit organizations and counselors can connect interested students with your nonprofit. This option often results in quality interns, as the students enter the career office seeking such opportunities.

Online Platforms

Online job listings are becoming some of the most popular places for potential interns and employees to find work. Sites such as SimplyHired and Indeed[BM1]  allow you to post your internship opportunity and review candidates online. Many online job platforms offer special rates or free listings to registered nonprofits.

Social Media

A strong social media presence is essential to the success of a nonprofit organization. It’s also one of the best ways to reach Gen Z, millennials, and older demographics. Use Instagram, Facebook, TikTok and other social media outlets to launch campaigns and sponsored posts advertising your nonprofit organization internships.

Word of Mouth

Word of mouth is one of the easiest and most effective ways to get the news out about your available nonprofit organization internships. Let current employees and your community know about available opportunities. Your organization’s positive reputation will help the word travel fast. Someone on your current team may already have a friend or acquaintance in mind.

6 Tips for Hiring Interns

How you hire interns can have a significant impact on their experience at your nonprofit organization. The following are a few effective tips to help ensure your potential interns understand what the position entails and how the internship can be mutually beneficial.

1. Explain the Internship Requirements Thoroughly

A key factor in finding the right interns and better ensuring they meet your expectations is being transparent. Interns should fully understand the responsibilities of the position, their expected schedule, and how you’ll measure their performance.

Many interns are juggling internships with school and or jobs. It’s important for them and the organization to know if the role is something they can handle. Now is also the time to explain what an ideal candidate looks like and the specific skills and characteristics you expect the intern to have.

2. Establish a Consistent Screening Process

A screening process narrows your list of potential candidates which helps you avoid hiring individuals who do not fit your organization’s needs. Your screening process may include the following methods and any others that are more specific to your nonprofit.

  • Review the intern’s application
  • Check references
  • Verify their skillset
  • Perform an online or phone interview
  • Perform a background check

3. Ensure Each Intern Has a Supervisor

Interns are typically seeking work experience or looking to fulfill requirements for a specific qualification. Assigning a supervisor to new interns throughout the hiring process and beyond will help ensure they understand their responsibilities. The supervisor is also the first person an intern can consult with questions or concerns.  

4. Emphasize the Organization’s Impact

Individuals seeking nonprofit internships are often looking for meaningful work that has a positive societal impact. Ensure that potential interns understand the cause the organization supports, how they’re increasing awareness, and how the intern’s position will help the organization achieve its goals.

5. Reflect and Offer Feedback Often

Interns are often eager to learn and advance in their careers. Establish time for interns to discuss the position and their experience as new recruits with their supervisors. While this may include reflecting on their goals or feelings about the organization, it’s also a time for interns to provide feedback.

Nonprofit internships are designed to benefit the intern and the organization. Interns can offer valuable insight into the pros and cons of the organization’s operations, scheduling demands, the recruitment process and more. 

6. Remain Adaptive

Being able to adapt is essential to an organization’s success. Remember that not all interns will become full-time employees and that your internship program may change as your organization grows or develops.

Keep an open mind when assessing potential interns, as some may prove to be greater assets than their resumes can express. An intern you thought was an ideal hire may not work out, while a less-qualified intern exceeds your expectations.

UST offers virtual HR solutions for organizations that don’t have full-time HR departments. We provide a complete range of HR resources to resolve HR issues quickly and smoothly. Our solutions support the unique needs of nonprofits, so you can stop worrying about HR concerns and focus on extending your organization’s positive impact.

For more insight into human resource best practices for nonprofits, join our newsletter.

Sources:

https://www.chooseust.org/ust-hr-workplace

https://www.chooseust.org/solutions-overview

https://www.volgistics.com/blog/how-to-recruit-nonprofit-interns/

https://www.wholewhale.com/tips/where-to-look-for-nonprofit-interns/

https://www.councilofnonprofits.org/about-americas-nonprofits/nonprofit-impact-communities

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/benefits-internships-nonprofits-students-scott-wylie#:~:text=By%20offering%20internships%2C%20nonprofits%20can,them%20in%20their%20future%20careers.

https://www.chooseust.org/


Our world continues to progress and it has become increasingly important for organizations to prioritize Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) awareness. Nonprofits, in particular, have a unique opportunity to lead the way in this area, as they are often centered around causes that directly impact marginalized communities. Furthermore, they also play an integral role in shaping society by addressing various social issues. As a nonprofit leader, you have a pivotal role in fostering a culture of DEI awareness within your organization. In this blog, we will explore actionable strategies that nonprofits can implement to cultivate and uphold a vibrant culture of DEI awareness.

Let’s dive in!

Train and Educate Your Staff and Board Members

Training and educating staff and board members are practical measures nonprofits can take to develop a culture of DEI awareness. Staff and board members who understand DEI concepts and issues like unconscious bias, microaggressions, and systemic racism can contribute to charting ways towards a more inclusive and equitable culture.

Include DEI in Organizational Policies

Inclusion of DEI practices in the organization’s employee handbook is another way to promote and foster a culture of awareness. The policies developed for your organization should state the organization’s commitment to DEI and create accountability provisions. This sends a message to employees, board members, and stakeholders of the importance placed on cultivating an inclusive workplace.

Encourage Employee Resource Groups

Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) provide an opportunity for employees to come together, share ideas, and connect with colleagues around shared interests or identities. This platform can help employees feel more seen and heard in the workplace, improving employee engagement and retention rates.

Foster Inclusivity in Recruiting and Hiring Process

Another way to build a DEI-oriented culture is by ensuring recruiting and hiring processes are also inclusive. The organization should examine its recruiting/hiring process and assess how it screens new applicants. It’s valuable to select candidates based on qualifications, and not based on appearance, background, or cultural fit. Diversity of thought helps drive your strategy, brings new ideas, and overall benefits your organization. Offering opportunities and a welcoming environment to underrepresented groups in society can help cultivate a culture of inclusivity.

Regularly Measure and Evaluate DEI Metrics

Evaluation and accountability are critical when developing a culture of DEI awareness. Nonprofits should set goals that measure their progress towards creating an inclusive culture, and these goals should be reviewed and reported the same way as financial performance. Regular evaluation and metrics help nonprofits to identify areas of success and shortcomings, thereby leading to areas of opportunity.

As a nonprofit leader, creating a culture of DEI awareness is an essential step for any nonprofit organization striving to be a top performer in fulfilling its mission. Nonprofits can foster a culture that embraces diversity, equity, and inclusion by implementing key strategies. These include educating employees, enhancing organizational policies, fostering inclusive hiring practices, encouraging employee resource groups (ERGs), and measuring DEI metrics. This approach not only improves engagement, but also fosters an inclusive and collaborative environment. Overall, this collective effort will elevate the impact and sustainability of the nonprofit’s mission.

Raising awareness and sparking conversations around DEI concepts, historical context, and current issues relevant to your cause is crucial. Consider hosting workshops or training sessions facilitated by outside experts who can provide valuable perspectives and create a safe space for these necessary conversations.

At UST, we understand the challenges faced by nonprofit leaders in terms of time and budget constraints. That’s why UST HR Workplace is here to help streamline the support your HR needs. Sign up today for a free 60-day trial and gain access to our live HR certified consultants, a library of 300+ on-demand training courses, and a comprehensive compliance library. We are here to empower you with the tools and training necessary to cultivate an inclusive and supportive environment.

Question: We’ve transitioned to a remote-first workforce. How can we keep our employees and managers engaged with video meetings and messaging apps—especially those employees that are missing the social aspects of working together physically?

Answer: Even with video conferencing and messaging apps, fully involving remote employees in team and company meetings remains a challenge. There may be no replacing the experience of being physically in the room, but you can take steps to make these meetings more productive and inclusive. 

The most important thing to remember when “meeting” with remote employees is that you can’t conduct the meeting in the same way as you normally do when everyone is physically present. You have to find a way to replace the advantages that close proximity has, especially the ease of reading body language and picking up social cues. These, unfortunately, do not translate well over the screen or the phone. So, what can you do? 

What remote employees need to fully participate in meetings is space and time to speak. You can provide this space and time in a few ways. First, if there are some physically present participants, ask them to pause for a second before jumping into the conversation. This gives remote employees time to get a word in, plus it helps counter any time delays caused by the conferencing technology. Second, whoever is leading the meeting should regularly invite remote employees to add anything if they have something to say, preferably before moving on in the agenda. Third, when possible, have a remote employee lead the meeting or a section on the agenda. This focuses attention on the remote speakers and can help remind everyone that the meeting isn’t just happening in the physical room. Finally, if a group of remote employees are located in the same workspace, occasionally setting their site as the physical meeting space can help your non-remote employees get a feel for the challenges of being remote during a meeting.

Some preliminary work before the meeting can also help make the meeting itself more efficient. First, test any systems ahead of time so that they’re working for everyone when the meeting starts. Second, email the agenda out so everyone knows what to expect. Third, assign someone in the meeting room to be the contact person that remote employees can email or message if they have questions, concerns, or issues. 

After the meeting, check in with any remote employees and ask them to be candid about their experience. What worked well and what could be improved? See what you can do to accommodate them in the next meeting. 

You may not be able to fully replicate the experience of physically being in the room, but taking these steps can enable remote employees to feel more involved and make the meeting itself run more smoothly.

This Q&A was provided by Mineral, powering the UST HR Workplace. Have HR questions? Sign your nonprofit up for a FREE 60-day trial here. As a UST member, simply log into your Mineral portal to access live HR certified consultants, 300+ on-demand training courses, an extensive compliance library, and more.

Nonprofit Burnout

Did you know that nearly a quarter of U.S. workers experience burnout? Nonprofit burnout numbers are even higher, with 50% of nonprofits experiencing high burnout levels.

The impact of burnout can lead to low employee morale and high turnover rates for nonprofit employees. Without identifying burnout and helping nonprofit employees manage it, your employees may decide to leave, or may have trouble accomplishing everyday tasks. These conditions could lead to limited results for the community your organization intends to serve.

Have you noticed burnout symptoms among your nonprofit employees and volunteers? Do you know the symptoms?

In this blog post, we’ll answer these questions and discuss what you can do to preserve good work- life balance, while prioritizing mental health and well-being to prevent nonprofit burnout.

What Is Nonprofit Burnout?

Burnout is a phenomenon that has become all too common in the workplace. It is typically the result of chronic workplace stress without proper attention and management.

There isn’t necessarily a medical diagnosis for this condition, but it is a mental health concern that can lead to deceased physical and mental health when it goes without recognition and correction.

Your employees likely love what they do for your nonprofit organization, but that doesn’t mean they are immune to the effects of prolonged stress that frequently leads to burnout.

While nonprofit work is meaningful and rewarding, it can also become emotionally draining for nonprofit staff due to the sense of urgency to improve the community. It isn’t unusual for nonprofit team members to work to the point of overworking themselves, and neglect self-care and their own mental well-being.

What Does Employee Nonprofit Burnout Look Like?

You probably know when you are asking more of your nonprofit employees. However, you may not be able to detect precisely when they are taking their duties and efforts beyond reasonable limits. Nonprofit burnout typically happens when employees are overloaded with work for a long period of time or lack adequate resources and time to do the necessary tasks.

If you know how to identify burnout among your nonprofit workers, it’s the first step in helping them.

As a nonprofit leader, note that these characteristics include:

  • Energy depletion and exhaustion.
  • Depersonalization and mental detachment, resulting in negative feelings and frustration or a lost sense of purpose.
  • A reduction in productivity and effectiveness at work.
  • Increased absenteeism.
  • Physical issues such as headaches, gastrointestinal issues, difficulty sleeping and a drastic change in eating habits.
  • Lack of creativity.
  • Memory problems.

6 Tips to Prevent Nonprofit Burnout

Fortunately, there are ways to help your valued nonprofit employees avoid or recover from nonprofit burnout.

1. Create a Checklist of Nonprofit Burnout Indicators

Detecting signs of burnout is a crucial first step in preventing or halting this damaging condition. You can start by using the above-noted characteristics of burnout to better ensure you notice the signals as early as possible.

2. Connect with Your Nonprofit Team Members Regularly

Whether your team members work on-site or in a remote or hybrid model, conduct regular meetings in-person or via a video conference platform. Ask your team members how things are going to make sure everyone’s has a balanced workload.

Let everyone know that you want them to speak up if they feel overwhelmed, and that you want to find a way to offer support if they do. It is also important to ask your nonprofit team members to offer support to one another when possible.

3. Promote Work-Life Balance

No matter how important your nonprofit’s mission, your employees’ health is vital. If they can’t work effectively, your nonprofit and the community you serve will suffer. Model healthy workplace behaviors that focus on work-life balance. Encourage employees to practice and prioritize self-care and setting boundaries.

4. Establish and Foster a Healthy Workplace Culture

Much of what we propose serves as establishing a good workplace culture, but there are some intentional steps to accomplish this, including the following:

  • Recognize employee “wins” to keep morale and engagement high.
  • Promote regular exercise, including lunchtime group walks or on-site yoga classes.
  • Sponsor employee activities such as participating in book clubs, trivia contests or board games at lunch.

5. Address Changes in Attitude and Behavior Among Employees

With the list of indicators in mind, if you detect drastic changes in a nonprofit employee’s attitude or behavior, it’s best to address this as soon as possible. Take a gentle approach and start by sending an email asking if everything is OK.

If you don’t find this strategy helpful, ask the employee to join you for a private meeting in your office. Let him or her know that it is OK to discuss problems, concerns and stressors — and that you are there to serve as support.

6. Remind and Encourage Employees to Take Time Off

It’s important for employees to use their PTO to maintain good mental, physical and emotional health — especially when working hard in the nonprofit sector. Many workers find it easy to skip days off to finish a project, but the potential for stress and burnout are too great. Remind employees that their project will be ready for them when they return and that, if necessary, other employees can help.

We hope you can help your dedicated employees avoid nonprofit burnout with these ideas. If you need more help, UST offers many solutions that help identify issues in your nonprofit organization.

Contact us if you need additional help to reduce nonprofit unemployment and HR liability.

 

Sources

https://www.mckinsey.com/mhi/our-insights/addressing-employee-burnout-are-you-solving-the-right-problem

https://www.goodera.com/blog/coping-with-nonprofit-burnout

https://www.urban.org/urban-wire/addressing-burnout-critical-social-sectors-success

https://nonprofitquarterly.org/avoiding-burnout-and-preserving-movement-leadership/

https://www.thehortongroup.com/resources/11-tips-for-nonprofits-to-prevent-employee-burnout/

https://www.funraise.org/blog/mental-health-matters-when-the-goalposts-are-always-moving-nonprofit-burnout-is-a-given

Terms Of Use

Privacy Policy and Terms of Use

UST maintains a secure site. This means that information we obtain from you in the process of enrolling is protected and cannot be viewed by others. Information about your agency is provided to our various service providers once you enroll in UST for the purpose of providing you with the best possible service. Your information will never be sold or rented to other entities that are not affiliated with UST. Agencies that are actively enrolled in UST are listed for review by other agencies, UST’s sponsors and potential participants, but no information specific to your agency can be reviewed by anyone not affiliated with UST and not otherwise engaged in providing services to you except as required by law or valid legal process.

Your use of this site and the provision of basic information constitute your consent for UST to use the information supplied.

UST may collect generic information about overall website traffic, and use other analytical information and tools to help us improve our website and provide the best possible information and service. As you browse UST’s website, cookies may also be placed on your computer so that we can better understand what information our visitors are most interested in, and to help direct you to other relevant information. These cookies do not collect personal information such as your name, email, postal address or phone number. To opt out of some of these cookies, click here. If you are a Twitter user, and prefer not to have Twitter ad content tailored to you, learn more here.

Further, our website may contain links to other sites. Anytime you connect to another website, their respective privacy policy will apply and UST is not responsible for the privacy practices of others.

This Privacy Policy and the Terms of Use for our site is subject to change.

Privacy Policy

Privacy Policy and Terms of Use

UST maintains a secure site. This means that information we obtain from you in the process of enrolling is protected and cannot be viewed by others. Information about your agency is provided to our various service providers once you enroll in UST for the purpose of providing you with the best possible service. Your information will never be sold or rented to other entities that are not affiliated with UST. Agencies that are actively enrolled in UST are listed for review by other agencies, UST’s sponsors and potential participants, but no information specific to your agency can be reviewed by anyone not affiliated with UST and not otherwise engaged in providing services to you except as required by law or valid legal process.

Your use of this site and the provision of basic information constitute your consent for UST to use the information supplied.

UST may collect generic information about overall website traffic, and use other analytical information and tools to help us improve our website and provide the best possible information and service. As you browse UST’s website, cookies may also be placed on your computer so that we can better understand what information our visitors are most interested in, and to help direct you to other relevant information. These cookies do not collect personal information such as your name, email, postal address or phone number. To opt out of some of these cookies, click here. If you are a Twitter user, and prefer not to have Twitter ad content tailored to you, learn more here.

Further, our website may contain links to other sites. Anytime you connect to another website, their respective privacy policy will apply and UST is not responsible for the privacy practices of others.

This Privacy Policy and the Terms of Use for our site is subject to change.