Performance Evaluation and Management is Changing- Thankfully.

Promoting from within can enhance internal productivity and increase external relations—if done right.

Truth be told, the process of hiring from within an organization is fairly common. Having built up trust and demonstrated more competence than the average worker bee, many workers within your organization may appear more than ready for a higher authority position.

But just because your buzziest employees are great at what they do now, it does not mean that they possess the skills and desire to move up within your agency.

While an individual may excel at his or her current tasks, the leap from associate to manager, for example, can damage one’s professional career. For instance, if a promoting manager fails to analyze the key differences in position responsibilities, the promoted worker may be unprepared or unwilling to perform the newly assigned tasks.

Such confusion (and irritability, or push back in some cases) will cause a domino effect within your organization. If other employees either don’t respect their newly appointed superior, or don’t feel that their new superior is prepared for the increase in responsibility, they may develop lazy work habits and become resentful. And when work production decreases, relationships with outside sources—whether with donors or community liaisons—will inevitably suffer.

And without growing external support, your company’s mission will become much harder to advance.

Avoid promotion regrets. Take the time to properly and effectively assess your potential candidates.

Here are some guidelines to follow when considering promoting within:

  • Coach your best workers. Mentor figures can help familiarize promotable employees with vital authoritative skills, so they can be groomed for future leadership roles.
  • Define what characteristics you are looking for. Specify the requirements and expectations necessary for the promotion. You want to eliminate any confusion and vagueness.
  • Constantly check in! After assigning new responsibilities or challenges, be sure to track the worker’s progress and adaptability rate. This will allow you to continue to measure their potential learning capabilities.
  • Give others a chance. While you may originally have someone in mind for the new role, don’t rule out other prospective employees. Certain workers may thrive under the pressure and exceed your expectations.
  • Take baby steps. Give your hardest workers added responsibilities over an extended period of time. The last thing you want is to overwhelm your employee and give them a role they aren’t yet conditioned to handle.

Hiring within is an extensive process, but produces worthwhile results when proper precautions are taken. Be responsible and prepare. Set the example. So your company’s future leaders can one day do the same.

Learn more ways you can turn a good worker into a strong leader here.

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07/29/13 7:32 PM

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