How To Improve Leadership Skills in Your Nonprofit

Professionals in the nonprofit sector are often more motivated by the mission over a high salary and interested in pursuing leadership roles that enable them to make a bigger impact towards their mission.

Many nonprofit executives and managers strive to understand how to improve leadership among their dedicated team members. Leadership in this context encompasses more than just guiding the organization towards its goals. It involves inspiring a team, cultivating a passionate and dedicated environment, and fostering a sense of shared purpose and camaraderie. It is important to remember that effective leadership goes beyond mere guidance; it involves creating an engaging and empowering atmosphere for everyone involved.

The challenges that nonprofits typically face, including limited resources, high community and peer expectations, and the need to maximize impact, require more and more unique effort from leaders. Nonprofit leadership requires individuals who possess a combination of strategic and resourceful capabilities, a deep connection to the organization’s mission, and an ability to embody its values.

While some of the necessary characteristics for leadership roles are organic to an individual, there is plenty that you can do to maximize natural talents by committing to nonprofit leadership training for your staff.

Please continue reading to discover how to identify potential leaders and how to develop a leader. With nonprofit executive leadership training, you can create a steady pipeline of caring and dutiful future managers and executives.

Tips for Improving Leadership Skills

Although some professionals are born with some natural leadership skills, they may need some guidance to hone and develop those skills to become a leader within your organization.

In this section, we delve into some practical and actionable tips for how to improve leadership. These steps are crucial for driving your organization forward with potential talent from among your existing and future team members.

1. Offer Broader Exposure to Your Organization’s Mission and Goals

As you strive to elevate and empower nonprofit employees to become leaders, they should understand as much about the nonprofit sector and your organization’s overarching mission as possible. They need to know more than their specific tasks within their department to see themselves moving up in your organization.

2. Provide Opportunities to Take on New Challenges

If you spot potential in an employee, help them develop their skills by providing a well-rounded perspective on daily challenges within your organization. Ask them to cross-train for roles in other departments to allow them to experience different roles and the accompanying challenges and rewards, of various positions.

3. Encourage Employees to Enhance Soft Skills

Soft skills are essential in nonprofit environments. As a leader, you likely find yourself using your communication, critical-thinking, problem-solving, time management, and teamwork skills daily. These skills are crucial to nonprofits operating with a limited budget and staff, which is not uncommon in this sector.

4. Assign Promising Employees Challenging Projects

When you identify potential leaders, it’s a good idea to offer them new opportunities that challenge them in different ways to see how they rise to overcome them and to continue sharpening their natural abilities.

5. Serve as a Support Source

Become a mentor to employees who show an interest in becoming a leader within your organization. Ask for insights and show trust and respect even when your decision differs from the employee’s preferred course of action.

6. Offer Training Opportunities

Whether your organization has the resources to create and offer a training program or if you decide to invest in one, some formal training can be beneficial. Well-structured and professional advice, guidance, and support can ensure effective learning and help track an employee’s progress.

How to Identify Potential Leaders

Often, identifying potential leaders begins with the hiring process. When you seek qualities such as passion for the nonprofit sector and your specific mission, as well as the above-noted soft skills and a desire to learn and grow, you need to nurture individuals, creating a steady pipeline of leadership talent.

At UST, we understand how challenging it is when trying to determine how to develop leadership skills in others, nurturing future leaders when you work with limited resources, including the on-hand staff to train top talent. We offer an expansive suite of nonprofit HR solutions for organizations that don’t have full-time HR departments, and can help you identify, train, and nurture talent to ensure you have a group of prepared and enthusiastic leaders.

Learn more about our services first-hand by signing up for our FREE 60-day trial, or contact us to discuss your nonprofit’s unique HR needs.

SOURCES

The Importance of Leadership Skills in the Nonprofit Sector

https://www.michaelpage.com/advice/management-advice/development-and-retention/how-develop-your-future-leaders

https://www.investopedia.com/terms/s/soft-skills.asp#:~:text=Soft%20skills%20can%20also%20be,carried%20over%20to%20any%20position.

https://www.cio.com/article/234848/6-leadership-qualities-to-look-for-when-hiring.html

https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/career-development/how-to-develop-leaders
https://www.qooper.io/blog/leadership-training-for-nurturing-a-future-leader
https://businessleadershiptoday.com/how-does-hr-help-leadership-development

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01/22/24 8:38 AM

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Privacy Policy and Terms of Use

UST maintains a secure site. This means that information we obtain from you in the process of enrolling is protected and cannot be viewed by others. Information about your agency is provided to our various service providers once you enroll in UST for the purpose of providing you with the best possible service. Your information will never be sold or rented to other entities that are not affiliated with UST. Agencies that are actively enrolled in UST are listed for review by other agencies, UST’s sponsors and potential participants, but no information specific to your agency can be reviewed by anyone not affiliated with UST and not otherwise engaged in providing services to you except as required by law or valid legal process.

Your use of this site and the provision of basic information constitute your consent for UST to use the information supplied.

UST may collect generic information about overall website traffic, and use other analytical information and tools to help us improve our website and provide the best possible information and service. As you browse UST’s website, cookies may also be placed on your computer so that we can better understand what information our visitors are most interested in, and to help direct you to other relevant information. These cookies do not collect personal information such as your name, email, postal address or phone number. To opt out of some of these cookies, click here. If you are a Twitter user, and prefer not to have Twitter ad content tailored to you, learn more here.

Further, our website may contain links to other sites. Anytime you connect to another website, their respective privacy policy will apply and UST is not responsible for the privacy practices of others.

This Privacy Policy and the Terms of Use for our site is subject to change.